Background: Studies exist that identify factors associated with higher professional satisfaction among clinicians. However, there are no reliable findings for clinicians with a migration background as to whether there is a correlation between particular dimensions of professional satisfaction and the desire to leave their current specialty or country of employment. For the first time, these data were collected within a questionnaire-based study from urological clinicians with a migration background (UCMBs) working in Germany. Material and Methods: A SurveyMonkey® with 101 items relating to characterizing features of the study participants and questions about job satisfaction (n = 39) was opened for UCMBs between August and October 2020. The influence of different dimensions of job satisfaction on the desire to quit the urological specialty/leave Germany was analyzed (group A: neither want to leave urology nor Germany; group B: can at least imagine leaving the urological profession and/or Germany). Results: Eighty-one UCMBs were distributed almost equally in groups A (50.6%) and B (49.4%). Occupational satisfaction was higher in several respects in group A. Three dimensions that differed significantly with regard to occupational satisfaction were used to create an aggregate score ranging from 3 to 15 points as follows: (1) relationship to superiors (p = 0.014), (2) career opportunities in the clinic (p < 0.001), and (3) opportunities for the further development of surgical skills (p = 0.006). For each point value of this aggregate score, the UCMB’s desire to quit urology or leave Germany (or at least uncertainty about this question) decreased by a relative value of 34.6% (odds ratio: 0.654, 95% confidence interval: 0.496–0.861, p = 0.002). Conclusions: Various dimensions of job satisfaction have been identified, the improvement of which could contribute to the long-term retention of UCMBs at German urological clinics.

1.
Bundesärztekammer
.
Ärztestatistik 2019
;
2021
. Available from: www.bundesaerztekammer.de. Accessed 2021 Mar 30.
2.
Pantenburg
B
,
Kitze
K
,
Luppa
M
,
König
HH
,
Riedel-Heller
SG
.
Job satisfaction of foreign-national physicians working in patient care: a cross-sectional study in Saxony, Germany
.
J Occup Med Toxicol
.
2016 Aug 30
;
11
(
1
):
41
.
3.
Koch
P
,
Zilezinski
M
,
Schulte
K
,
Strametz
R
,
Nienhaus
A
,
Raspe
M
.
How perceived quality of care and job satisfaction are associated with intention to leave the profession in young nurses and physicians
.
Int J Environ Res Public Health
.
2020 Apr 15
;
17
(
8
):
2714
. .
4.
Pantenburg
B
,
Kitze
K
,
Luppa
M
,
König
HH
,
Riedel-Heller
SG
.
Physician emigration from Germany: insights from a survey in Saxony, Germany
.
BMC Health Serv Res
.
2018 May 9
;
18
(
1
):
341
.
5.
Heponiemi
T
,
Hietapakka
L
,
Kaihlanen
A
,
Aalto
AM
.
The turnover intentions and intentions to leave the country of foreign-born physicians in Finland: a cross-sectional questionnaire study
.
BMC Health Serv Res
.
2019 Sep 3
;
19
(
1
):
624
.
6.
May
M
,
Shaar
M
,
Gumz
A
,
Shaar
A
,
Necknig
UH
,
Braun
KP
,
Relationship between non-medical reading with burnout and professional satisfaction among urologists with migration background: results of the EUTAKD survey study conducted at German hospitals
.
Aktuelle Urol
.
2021 April 29
.
7.
May
M
.
Zufriedenheit ausländischer Ärzte in den urologischen Kliniken Deutschlands
.
Uro-News
.
2020
;
24
(
9
):
30
. .
10.
Domagała
A
,
Bała
MM
,
Peña-Sánchez
JN
,
Storman
D
,
Świerz
MJ
,
Kaczmarczyk
M
,
Satisfaction of physicians working in hospitals within the European Union: state of the evidence based on systematic review
.
Eur J Public Health
.
2019 Apr 1
;
29
(
2
):
232
41
. .
Copyright / Drug Dosage / Disclaimer
Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher.
Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.
You do not currently have access to this content.