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Keywords: Type A behavior
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Journal Articles
Psychother Psychosom (1997) 66 (6): 314–318.
Published Online: 18 February 2010
...Isao Fukunishi; Masaki Hattori Background: In Japanese studies, job involvement, e.g., job-centered lifestyle has been thought to be a major component in Type A behavior (TAB) rather than hostility and anger. We examined the influence of TAB including job involvement such as job-centered lifestyle...
Journal Articles
Psychother Psychosom (1995) 63 (3-4): 142–150.
Published Online: 18 February 2010
... and education were studied, and psychological assessments of irritability, hostility, ‘John Henryism’ and type A behavior pattern carried out. Hypertensive premenopausal women (n = 29) were compared with healthy, age-matched, normotensive women (n = 18). Neither the women nor the examining physicians were aware...
Journal Articles
Journal Articles
Journal Articles
Psychother Psychosom (1993) 60 (3-4): 148–167.
Published Online: 18 February 2010
..., the pharmacotherapy of depression in this specific patient population, the psychiatric risk factors for coronary artery disease, and the treatment of hostility, stress and type A behavior are discussed. 18 2 2010 © 1993 S. Karger AG, Basel 1993 Copyright / Drug Dosage / Disclaimer Copyright: All...
Journal Articles
Journal Articles
Psychother Psychosom (2003) 72 (6): 343–349.
Published Online: 09 October 2003
..., such as type A behavior and irritable mood. Only high levels of self-perceived stressful life circumstances and psychological distress approached statistical significance as a psychological risk factor for cardiovascular events after myocardial infarction. Conclusions: Psychological evaluation of patients...
Journal Articles
Psychother Psychosom (2001) 70 (4): 176–183.
Published Online: 21 June 2001
... frequent: demoralization, type A behavior, irritable mood and alexithymia. Conclusions: The joint use of DSM and DCPR criteria was found to improve the identification of psychological factors which could result in a worsening of quality of life in heart-transplanted patients. Cardiac transplantation...