Introduction: Ceiling fans are a widespread energy-efficient appliance required for managing the sweltering weather extremes encountered in northern Australian states including Queensland. Ceiling fans are also a rare cause of serious head injury in children requiring neurosurgical intervention. There is limited available evidence on the presentation, mechanism, and management of these injuries. Methods: A retrospective analysis of children who suffered ceiling fan injuries admitted to the Queensland Children’s Hospital, a level-1 paediatric trauma hospital in Brisbane, Queensland, under the neurosurgery unit from November 2014 to July 2018 was performed. Results: Seventeen children (64.7% male) with a mean age of 4.24 years (range 0.66–7.25) sustained ceiling fan injuries requiring neurosurgical management during this period. Children were injured following being accidentally lifted or thrown into the ceiling fan path; jumping, playing, climbing, or being pushed from a bunk bed; or climbing on other furniture. All patients suffered skull fractures (88.2% depressed), and 65% suffered extra-axial or intracerebral haemorrhage. Operative management was required in 76.5% of the patients. No patients suffered adverse outcomes, and no complications, including infections, were recorded. Conclusions: Despite their rarity, paediatric ceiling fan injuries requiring neurosurgical management are a cause of significant morbidity. Surgical management targeted elevation of depressed fractures and washout of open fractures rather than evacuation of intracranial collections. Almost all included patients required transfer with associated social and economic implications. Such injuries are largely preventable with improved supervision and safety awareness. Hazard modification may be extended to regulatory changes or improved ceiling fan design.

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