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Keywords: Mitochondria
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Journal Articles
Neurosignals (2018) 25 (1): 26–38.
Published Online: 01 September 2017
... blotting and electron microscopy and analyzed the effect of newly synthesized, mitochondria-targeted, Kv1.3 inhibitors on the induction of cell death in these cells. Finally, we performed in vivo studies on glioma bearing mice. Results: Here, we report that Kv1.3 is expressed in mitochondria of human...
Journal Articles
Neurosignals (2012) 20 (4): 265–280.
Published Online: 23 February 2012
... between the ER and mitochondria in neurodegeneration, we treated SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells with thapsigargin and tunicamycin, two inducers of ER stress, and atrazine, a promoter of mitochondrial stress. Each pharmacological agent caused mitochondrial dysfunction, which was characterized by reduced...
Journal Articles
Neurosignals (2005) 14 (1-2): 71–82.
Published Online: 10 June 2005
... mitochondria, and interfere with APP metabolism. Antagonizing effects on NMDA receptors and potassium currents may contribute to the neuroprotection as well. It is also possible that the non-catalytic function of AChE is involved in neuroprotective effects of HupA. The therapeutic effects of HupA on AD or VD...
Journal Articles
Journal Articles
Biological Signals and Receptors (2001) 10 (3-4): 189–199.
Published Online: 24 May 2001
...Jingxiang Bai; Arthur I. Cederbaum Mitochondria dysfunction induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) is related to many human diseases and aging. In physiological conditions, the mitochondrial respiratory chain is the major source of ROS. ROS could be reduced by intracellular antioxidant enzymes...
Journal Articles
Biological Signals and Receptors (2001) 10 (3-4): 162–175.
Published Online: 24 May 2001
...Axel Kowald Mitochondria are not only the main source of energy for most eukaryotic cells, but also the main source of free radicals. These reactive molecules can damage all components of a cell such as membranes, proteins and DNA. Therefore they have long been suspected to be involved...
Journal Articles
Biological Signals and Receptors (2001) 10 (3-4): 254–262.
Published Online: 24 May 2001
... Aging Mitochondria Alzheimer’s disease Biol Signals Recept 2001;10:254 262 Mitochondrial Function and Alzheimer s Disease J. Ojaimia,b E. Byrneb aDepartment of Neurology, Columbia University, New York, N.Y., USA; bMelbourne Neuromuscular Research Center, St. Vincent s Hospital, Fitzroy, Australia...
Journal Articles
Biological Signals and Receptors (2001) 10 (3-4): 147–161.
Published Online: 24 May 2001
...Roberta A. Gottlieb Apoptosis is a coordinated sequence of events culminating in the death of the cell. Many of these biochemical processes are regulated by the mitochondria, including the release of proapoptotic molecules in addition to the caspase-activating cofactor, cytochrome c. Pro...
Journal Articles
Biological Signals and Receptors (2001) 10 (3-4): 263–270.
Published Online: 24 May 2001
... of Clinical Neurosciences, Royal Free and University College Medical School and dInstitute of Neurology, University College, London, UK Key Words Friedreich s ataxia W Genetics W Mitochondria W Oxidative stress W Iron metabolism W Cardiomyopathy W Magnetic resonance spectroscopy W Metabolism chain complex...
Journal Articles
Biological Signals and Receptors (2001) 10 (3-4): 224–253.
Published Online: 24 May 2001
... with Parkinson’s disease, CoQ 10 is able to attenuate the MPTP-induced loss of striatal dopaminergic neurons. 24 5 2001 Biol Signals Recept 2001;10:224 253 Ubiquinone (Coenzyme Q10) and Mitochondria in Oxidative Stress of Parkinson s Disease M. Ebadi P. Govitrapong S. Sharma D. Muralikrishnan S. Shavali...
Journal Articles
Biological Signals and Receptors (2001) 10 (3-4): 200–223.
Published Online: 24 May 2001
... in the pathogenesis of a variety of cardiovascular diseases, including heart failure, myocardial infarction and atherosclerosis. Recently, it has become evident that mitochondria play important role in the signaling machinery of apoptotic cell death by releasing several apoptotic factors such as cytochrome c...
Journal Articles
Biological Signals and Receptors (2001) 10 (1-2): 81–92.
Published Online: 28 February 2001
... that antioxidant enzymes in mitochondria may be responsible for the regulation of cytochrome c release and apoptotic cell death. This paper examines the current state of knowledge regarding the role of mitochondrial antioxidant enzymes, especially phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase. A model...
Journal Articles
Biological Signals and Receptors (2001) 10 (1-2): 66–80.
Published Online: 28 February 2001
... to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements. Nitric oxide Peroxynitrite Oxidative stress Mitochondria Respiration Biol Signals Recept 2001;10:66 80 Peroxynitrite-Mediated Mitochondrial Dysfunction Jorge...
Journal Articles
Biological Signals and Receptors (2001) 10 (1-2): 14–25.
Published Online: 28 February 2001
...Sigune Schmidt; Andreas Strub; Wolfgang Voos The biogenesis of mitochondria requires the translocation of most mitochondrial proteins across two biological membranes. Mitochondrial preproteins are synthesized in the cytosol carrying targeting information, that is recognized by specific receptor...
Journal Articles
Journal Articles
Biological Signals and Receptors (2001) 10 (1-2): 112–124.
Published Online: 28 February 2001
.... By downregulating mitochondrial generation of superoxide and related ROS, vitamin E not only attenuates oxidative damage but also modulates the expression and activation of signal transduction pathways and other redox-sensitive biological modifiers. Vitamin E Mitochondria Superoxide Hydrogen peroxide ©...
Journal Articles
Biological Signals and Receptors (2001) 10 (1-2): 57–65.
Published Online: 28 February 2001
...Pedram Ghafourifar; Urs Bringold; Sabine D. Klein; Christoph Richter Nitric oxide (NO) exerts a wide range of its biological properties via its interaction with mitochondria. By competing with O 2 , physiologically relevant concentrations of NO reversibly inhibit cytochrome oxidase and decrease O 2...
Journal Articles
Biological Signals and Receptors (2001) 10 (1-2): 125–140.
Published Online: 28 February 2001
.... On the other hand, if mitochondrial production of ROS supplies a remarkable contribution to exercise-induced oxidative stress, mitochondria should be a primary target of oxidative damage. Unfortunately, there are controversial reports concerning the exercise effects on structural and functional characteristics...