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Keywords: 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine
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Journal Articles
Journal Articles
Journal Articles
Neuropsychobiology (2009) 60 (3-4): 204–212.
Published Online: 05 November 2009
...Clare Dickson; Raimondo Bruno; John Brown Aims/Objectives: A growing body of evidence suggests that regular ‘ecstasy’ (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine) use causes lasting changes to central serotonergic functioning in humans, including in the occipital lobe. Serotonin may play a role in visual...
Journal Articles
Neuropsychobiology (2009) 60 (3-4): 176–187.
Published Online: 05 November 2009
...) Australian Customs Service 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) detections; (2) the National Drug Strategy Household and Australian Secondary Student Alcohol and Drug Surveys; (3) data from Australia’s ecstasy and Related Drugs Reporting System; (4) the number of recorded police incidents for ecstasy...
Journal Articles
Journal Articles
Journal Articles
Neuropsychobiology (2009) 60 (3-4): 159–175.
Published Online: 05 November 2009
...Philip N. Murphy; Michelle Wareing; John E. Fisk; Catharine Montgomery Aims: This review examined studies of executive functioning in abstinent ecstasy (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, MDMA) users on tasks which had been empirically mapped onto updating, shifting, inhibition and accessing long...
Journal Articles
Neuropsychobiology (2009) 60 (3-4): 130–136.
Published Online: 05 November 2009
...Susan Schenk The prevalence of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) use has increased globally and the pattern of consumption has changed considerably. Previously, a subculture of MDMA users was fairly restricted to the dance club scene. More recently, use has spread outside of this subculture...
Journal Articles
Journal Articles