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Keywords: G-protein-coupled receptors
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Journal Articles
Neuroendocrinology (2006) 82 (3-4): 139–150.
Published Online: 08 May 2006
...Steven W. Sutton; Pascal Bonaventure; Chester Kuei; Diane Nepomuceno; Jiejun Wu; Jessica Zhu; Timothy W. Lovenberg; Changlu Liu Relaxin-3 is a recently discovered member of the insulin/relaxin superfamily that has been shown to be the endogenous ligand for G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)135...
Journal Articles
Neuroendocrinology (2005) 80 (6): 368–378.
Published Online: 25 May 2005
... Catecholamine receptors G-protein-coupled receptors Secretory cells increase their secretory activity upon a rise in the concentration of intracellular Ca 2+ ([Ca 2+ ] i ). Such a rise can occur by Ca 2+ influx through high-voltage-activated (HVA) Ca 2+ channels in the plasma membrane [ 1, 2, 3...
Journal Articles
Neuroendocrinology (2005) 80 (5): 298–307.
Published Online: 25 February 2005
...Steven W. Sutton; Pascal Bonaventure; Chester Kuei; Barbara Roland; Jingcai Chen; Diane Nepomuceno; Timothy W. Lovenberg; Changlu Liu G-protein-coupled receptor 135 (GPCR135), a former orphan GPCR also known as SALPR, has recently been shown to be modulated by relaxin-3 (R3). In addition to GPCR135...
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Journal Articles
Neuroendocrinology (2000) 72 (6): 379–391.
Published Online: 22 December 2000
... domain, G-protein-coupled receptor superfamily [ 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 ], whereas the nts3 receptor is a non-G-protein-coupled receptor with a single transmembrane domain [ 11 ]. The three receptor subtypes differ by their pharmacological properties. The NTS1 receptor exhibits high affinity for NT...