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Introduction: GnRHas are used for treatment of precocious puberty. Over the last decade, several new formulations have been approved. Methods: The Drugs & Therapeutics subcommittee of the Pediatric Endocrine Society (PES) undertook a review to ascertain the current treatment options, prescribing behaviors, and practices of GnRHas among pediatric endocrinologists practicing within the United States. The survey consisted of four main subsections: 1. Description of clinical practice; 2. Self-assessment of knowledge base of pediatric and adult GnRHa formulations; 3. Current practice for treating CPP; and 4. Utilization of healthcare resources. Results: There were 223 survey respondents. Pediatric endocrine practitioners were most familiar with the pediatric one-monthly preparation, the three-month preparation, and the histrelin implant (Supprelin®) (61.9%, 71.7%, and 34.5%, respectively), with lower familiarity for 24-week triptorelin intramuscular (Triptodur®) and 22.9% and six-month subcutaneous leuprolide (Fensolvi®). Only 23% of the respondents reported being extremely familiar with the availability of adult formulations, and 25% reported being completely unaware of cost differences between pediatric and adult GnRHa preparations. The implant was the most preferred therapy (44.4%), but in practice, respondents reported a higher percentage of patients were treated with 3-month preparation. While family preference/ease of treatment (87%) was the key determinant for using a particular GnRHa preparation, insurance coverage also played a significant role in the decision (65.5%). Responses regarding assessment for efficacy of treatment were inconsistent, as were practices and criteria for obtaining an MRI. Conclusions: The survey indicated there is more familiarity with older, shorter-acting GnRHas, which are prescribed in greater numbers than newer, longer-acting formulations. There is lack of consensus on the need for CNS imaging in girls presenting with CPP between 6-8 years of age and use of laboratory testing to monitor response to treatment. Insurance requirements regarding CNS imaging and laboratory monitoring are highly variable. Despite having similar constituents and bioavailability there are substantial cost differences between the pediatric and adult formulations and lack of evidence for safe use of these formulations in children. The survey-based analysis highlights the challenges faced by prescribers, while reflecting on areas where further research is needed to provide evidence-based practice guidelines for pediatric endocrinologists.

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