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Keywords: Social organisation
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Journal Articles
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Folia Primatol (1995) 65 (1): 25–29.
Published Online: 16 September 2008
...(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements. Callithrix aurita Marmosets Callitrichidae Polygyny Mating systems Social organisation Brief Report Folia...
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Folia Primatol (1994) 63 (4): 226–228.
Published Online: 16 September 2008
..., quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements. Patas monkey Social organisation Field study Virology Epidemiology Simian...
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Folia Primatol (1991) 57 (2): 102–105.
Published Online: 12 September 2008
...Hannah Buchanan-Smith Goeldi’s monkey Callimico goeldii Social organisation Field study Group size Monogamy 19 07 1990 9 01 1991 12 9 2008 1991 Copyright / Drug Dosage / Disclaimer Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may...
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Folia Primatol (1992) 58 (4): 215–218.
Published Online: 12 September 2008
... responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements. Callithrix flaviceps Group composition Recruitment Migration Social organisation Marmosets Field study Brief Report Folia Primatol 1992;58...
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Folia Primatol (1981) 35 (4): 288–312.
Published Online: 11 September 2008
... of ground level, travelling mainly by vertical clinging and leaping. We believe that this ecological specialisation accounts for the species’ discontinuous microdistribution, and that this in turn is related to Callimico’s distinctive pattern of social organisation. Callimico goeldii Distribution...
Journal Articles
Journal Articles
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Folia Primatol (1975) 23 (3): 165–207.
Published Online: 10 September 2008
... and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements. Red colobus Black and white colobus Food selection Social organisation Folia primatol. 23: 165-207 (1975) Feeding...
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Folia Primatol (1973) 20 (1): 12–26.
Published Online: 09 September 2008
... on flight behaviour, intragroup relations, inter­ species associations, and the determinants of troop composition are made. Key Words Colobus Ecology Social organisation Diet Flight reaction Black-and-white colobus have been studied at a number of sites, all in East Africa [Ullrich, 1961 ; Schenkel...
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Folia Primatol (1973) 19 (2-3): 166–192.
Published Online: 09 September 2008
..., quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements. Social organisation Presbytis senex Adult male replacements Population...
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Folia Primatol (1971) 15 (3-4): 183–200.
Published Online: 09 September 2008
... Atlas of Morocco Macaca sylvana live in Key Words multimale groups of 12 to 30 individuals. With extensive home range Macaca sylvana overlap intergroup encounters are frequent, usually peaceful and Social organisation variable in nature. The social interactions of babies are described Social behaviour...
Journal Articles
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Further Areas
Folia Primatol (2002) 73 (1): 1–20.
Published Online: 14 June 2002
...), excess male dispersal from the population or a combination of both. We conclude that the orang-utan social organisation is best described as a loose community, showing neither spatial nor social exclusivity, consisting of one or more female clusters and the adult male they all prefer as mate. 14 6...
Journal Articles