Background/Aims: The number of migrant children referred to speech-language pathologists (SLPs) is increasing in the United States. SLPs need to be competent in distinguishing between a language disorder and language differences associated with children who are learning English as a new language. Methods: SLPs need to acquire the knowledge, skills, and cultural attitudes to evaluate language of bilingual children to competently assess and intervene with linguistically diverse children and families. Often children separated from their biological parents at the border are placed in foster homes, and the foster parents often do not have essential information regarding the children’s developmental history to share with the SLP. The children described in this article include school-age children in the United States who are learning to speak English as a second language and are migrants. Results: This article presents the difficulties faced when working with children learning a new language, effective strategies used with this population, and some of the resources available in the United States for children and families. Conclusion: This article highlights some challenges SLPs experience, assessment protocols used in different states and local school districts, successful strategies that involve working with interpreters, and varied service delivery options.

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