Side effects were compared in 9 patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome treated with standard intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) only and in 9 treated with combined methylprednisolone and IVIg therapy. Headache occurred in 2 in both groups, indicative that pre-infusion with steroids does not prevent headache. Transient liver function disturbances were present in 2 patients of the former group and in 6 of the latter.

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