Introduction: Cartilaginous tumors involving the small bones of the hands and feet are usually benign such as enchondroma, chondromyxoid fibroma and chondroblastoma. The small bones of the hands and feet are rarely involved by primary chondrosarcoma. Proximal phalanges are the most common sites in the hands, but the fourth digit is the least common site. Case Presentation: We report a case of a 76-year-old Greek female who presented to our hospital with a painful swollen mass measuring 4.5 × 2.6 cm on the fourth digit of the left hand. The radiograph showed a destructive, permeative lytic tumor of the proximal phalanx with extension into soft tissue. The patient underwent curettage, and the microscopic examination of the specimen revealed grade 2 chondrosarcoma. Conclusion: Cartilaginous tumors involving the small bones of the hands and feet are usually benign such as enchondroma, chondromyxoid fibroma and chondroblastoma. Primary chondrosarcoma is the third most common malignancy of bone after myeloma and osteosarcoma, but the small bones of the hands and feet are very rarely involved by chondrosarcoma (1% of all chondrosarcoma). However, in these cases differentiation between a benign lesion and chondrosarcoma may be difficult. Occasionally chondrosarcoma of the hands and feet is associated with multiple recurrences or distal metastasis.

This content is only available via PDF.
Open Access License / Drug Dosage / Disclaimer
Open Access License: This is an Open Access article licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported license (CC BY-NC) (www.karger.com/OA-license), applicable to the online version of the article only. Distribution permitted for non-commercial purposes only.
Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.