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Introduction. It is unknown how cardiac imaging studies are used by neurologists to investigate cardioembolic sources in ischemic stroke patients. Methods. Between August 12, 2023 and December 8, 2023, we conducted an international survey among neurologists from Europe, North America, South America, and Asia, to investigate the frequency of utilization of cardiac imaging studies for the detection of cardioembolic sources of ischemic stroke. Questions were structured into deciles of percentage utilization of transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), ECG-gated cardiac computed tomography (G-CCT), and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI). We estimated the weighted proportion (x ̅) of utilization of each cardiac imaging modality, both globally and by continent. We also investigated the use of head and neck computed tomography angiography (CTA) as an emerging approach to the screening of cardioembolic sources. Results. A total of 402 neurologists from 64 countries completed the survey. Globally, TTE was the most frequently used cardiac imaging technology (x ̅=71.2%), followed by TEE (x ̅=15.8%), G-CCT (x ̅=10.9%), and CMRI (x ̅=7.7%). Findings were consistent across all continents. A total of 288 respondents routinely used a CTA in the acute ischemic stroke phase (71.6%), but the CTA included a non-gated CCT in only 15 cases (5.2%). Conclusions. This survey suggests that basic cardiac imaging is not done in all ischemic stroke patients evaluated in 4 continents. We also found a substantially low utilization of advanced cardiac imaging studies. Easier to adopt screening methods for cardioembolic sources of embolism are needed.

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