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Intruduction: AKI is a frequent complication in critical illness and portends poor outcome. CCL14 has been validated to predict persistent severe AKI in critically ill patients. We examined the association of CCL14 with urine output within 48 hours. Methods: In pooled data from 2 studies of critically ill patients with KDIGO stage 2-3 AKI, CCL14 was measured by NEPHROCLEAR™CCL14 Test on the Astute 140® Meter, and divided to low, intermediate and high categories (1.3 and 13 ng/mL). Average hourly urine output over 48 hours, stage 3 AKI per urine output criterion on day 2, and composite of dialysis or death within 7 days were examined using multivariable mixed, and logistic regression models. Results: Of the 497 subjects with median age of 65 [56-74] years, 49% (242/497) were on diuretics. CCL14 concentration was low in 219 (44%), intermediate in 217 (44%), and high in 61 (12%) patients. In mixed regression analysis, urine output trajectory over time was different within each CCL14 risk category based on diuretic use due to significant three-way interaction (p < 0.001). In logistic regression analysis CCL14 risk category was independently associated with low urine output on day 2 (KDIGO stage 3) adjusted for diuretic use and baseline clinical variables and composite of dialysis or death within 7 days (adjusted for urine output within 48 hours of CCL14 measurement). Conclusions: CCL14 measured in patients with moderate to severe AKI is associated with urine output trajectory within 48 hours, oliguria on day 2, and dialysis within 7 days.

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