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Book Chapter
Book Chapter
Series: World Review of Nutrition and Dietetics
Volume: 6
Published: 25 November 1965
10.1159/000391426
EISBN: 978-3-318-04190-3
Book Chapter
Series: Forum of Nutrition
Volume: 57
Published: 13 January 2005
10.1159/000083772
EISBN: 978-3-318-01183-8
... < 0.001). Half (51%) of theexamined adults eat less than 100 g fruit per day, 23% between 100 and 200 g and only 26%more than the recommended 200 g. Most of the fruit is consumed fresh, frozen fruits andfruits in cans are not very popular. The favorite fruits are stone fruits, followed by citrus andberry...
Book
Book Cover Image
Series: World Review of Nutrition and Dietetics
Volume: 18
Published: 21 July 1973
10.1159/isbn.978-3-318-04202-3
EISBN: 978-3-318-04202-3
Book
Book Cover Image
Series: World Review of Nutrition and Dietetics
Volume: 6
Published: 25 November 1965
10.1159/isbn.978-3-318-04190-3
EISBN: 978-3-318-04190-3
Book Chapter
Series: Translational Research in Biomedicine
Volume: 4
Published: 30 April 2015
EISBN: 978-3-318-05445-3
.... Zygmunt K, Faubert B, MacNeil J, Tsiani E: Naringenin, a citrus flavonoid, increases muscle cell glucose uptake via AMPK. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 2010;398:178-183. 68. Huong DT, Takahashi Y, Ide T: Activity and mRNA levels of enzymes involved in hepatic fatty acid oxidation in mice fed citrus...
Book Chapter
Series: Translational Research in Biomedicine
Volume: 4
Published: 30 April 2015
10.1159/000375423
EISBN: 978-3-318-05445-3
... risk [ 82 ]. Epidemiological studies with naringenin yielded inconsistent results regarding its effect on breast cancer incidence [ 82 ]. However, various studies demonstrated an inverse association of naringenin with ER-positive breast cancer risk if citrus fruits, which have high naringenin...
Book Chapter
Series: World Review of Nutrition and Dietetics
Volume: 102
Published: 08 August 2011
10.1159/000327799
EISBN: 978-3-8055-9780-7
... found in the Okinawan diet (e.g. gingerol-zingerone, a major component of ginger root) have antidiarrheic, antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic activities that may act through the activation of similar pathways [ 19 - 21 ]. Naringenin, a citrus flavonoid structurally similar to resveratrol and present...
Book Chapter
Series: Current Problems in Dermatology
Volume: 50
Published: 01 September 2016
10.1159/000446051
EISBN: 978-3-318-05889-5
... [ 15 ]. Foods have been implicated in idiopathic pruritus ani such as caffeinated drinks, alcohol, milk products, peanuts, spices, citrus fruits, grapes, tomatoes (histamine), and chocolate; some researchers have shown a decrease in itch within 14 days if these are avoided [ 15 ]. Management...
Book Chapter
Series: Monographs in Oral Science
Volume: 25
Published: 24 June 2014
EISBN: 978-3-318-02553-8
..., Gedalia I, Pisanti S: Effects of fluoride pretreatment in vitro on human teeth exposed to citrus juice. J Dent Res 1972;51:1677. 41. Bartlett DW, Smith BG, Wilson RF: Comparison of the effect of fluoride and non-fluoride toothpaste on tooth wear in vitro and the influence of enamel fluoride...
Book Chapter
Series: World Review of Nutrition and Dietetics
Volume: 124
Published: 15 June 2022
10.1159/000516720
EISBN: 978-3-318-06296-0
... absorbed than non-haem iron from plant sources (see Table 3 ). Non-haem iron absorption from plant foods can be increased by consuming meat proteins or a source of vitamin C (e.g., citrus fruits/juices, strawberries, kiwi fruit, tomatoes, broccoli) with the same meal. Dietary components which can inhibit...
Book Chapter
Series: World Review of Nutrition and Dietetics
Volume: 102
Published: 08 August 2011
EISBN: 978-3-8055-9780-7
... substances with cancer preventive and therapeutic potential. Forum Nutr 2009;61:182-192 22. Zygmunt K, Faubert B, MacNeil J, Tsiani E: Naringenin, a citrus flavonoid, increases muscle cell glucose uptake via AMPK. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 2010;398:178-183 23. Chung S, Yao H, Caito S, Hwang JW...
Book
Book Cover Image
Published: 23 April 2002
10.1159/isbn.978-3-318-00811-1
EISBN: 978-3-318-00811-1
Book Chapter
Series: Nestlé Nutrition Institute Workshop Series
Volume: 75
Published: 15 August 2013
10.1159/000345822
EISBN: 978-3-318-02333-6
... in reducing infection incidence in athletes who are training hard. Naturally occurring polyphenolic compounds are present in foods such green leafy vegetables, onions, apples, pears, citrus fruits and red grapes as well as some plant-based beverages such as citrus juices, green tea, red wine and beer...
Book Chapter
Series: Monographs in Oral Science
Volume: 29
Published: 12 January 2021
EISBN: 978-3-318-06852-8
... diseases. PLoS One 2014;9:e105475. 78. Wongsariya K, et al: Synergistic interaction and mode of action of Citrus hystrix essential oil against bacteria causing periodontal diseases. Pharm Biol 2014;52:273–280. 79. Fontana CR, et al: The effect of blue light on periodontal biofilm growth in vitro...
Book Chapter
Series: Monographs in Oral Science
Volume: 28
Published: 07 January 2020
10.1159/000455379
EISBN: 978-3-318-06517-6
... to be associated with periodontal disease since the 18th century when sailors suffering from scurvy (a vitamin C deficiency disease) reported bleeding gums and loosening teeth. In 1747 James Lind conducted an experiment whereby he treated 2 sailors with citrus fruits, a source of vitamin C, who mostly recovered...
Book Chapter
Series: World Review of Nutrition and Dietetics
Volume: 113
Published: 17 April 2015
10.1159/000367872
EISBN: 978-3-318-02691-7
... or a source of vitamin C (e.g. citrus fruits/juices, strawberries, kiwi fruit, tomatoes and broccoli) at the same meal. Dietary components which can inhibit the absorption of both haem and non-haem iron include calcium, zinc and phytates found in legumes and whole grains. Polyphenols found in tea and coffee...
Book
Book Cover Image
Series: World Review of Nutrition and Dietetics
Volume: 24
Published: 26 July 1976
10.1159/isbn.978-3-318-04208-5
EISBN: 978-3-318-04208-5
Book Chapter
Series: Chemical Immunology and Allergy
Volume: 101
Published: 21 May 2015
10.1159/000373911
EISBN: 978-3-318-02341-1
... cohort study (n = 1,612) suggested that delaying the introduction of cereal grains until after 6 months might increase the risk of wheat allergy. By contrast, Saarinen et al.'s [ 48 ] observational study found no difference in the cumulative incidence of fish and citrus allergy at 3 years of age between...
Book Chapter
Series: Chemical Immunology and Allergy
Volume: 101
Published: 21 May 2015
EISBN: 978-3-318-02341-1
... of initial exposure to cereal grains and the risk of wheat allergy. Pediatrics 2006;117:2175-2182. 48. Saarinen UM, Kajosaari M: Does dietary elimination in infancy prevent or only postpone a food allergy? A study of fish and citrus allergy in 375 children. Lancet 1980;1:166-167. 49. Nwaru BI...