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Book Chapter
Series: Medicine and Sport Science
Volume: 59
Published: 17 October 2012
10.1159/000341954
EISBN: 978-3-8055-9993-1
... Abstract An optimal post-exercise nutrition regimen is fundamental for ensuring recovery. Therefore, research has aimed to examine post-exercise nutritional strategies for enhanced training stimuli. Chocolate milk has become an affordable recovery beverage for many athletes, taking the place...
Book Chapter
Series: Medicine and Sport Science
Volume: 59
Published: 17 October 2012
EISBN: 978-3-8055-9993-1
...: Recovery from training: a brief review. J Strength Cond Res 2008;229:1-10 4. Pritchett K, Pritchett R, Bishop P: Nutritional strategies for post-exercise recovery: a review. S Afr J Sports Med 2011;23:20-25 5. Karp JR, Johnston JD, Tecklenburg S, Mickleborough TD, Fly AD, Stager JM: Chocolate milk...
Book Chapter
Series: World Review of Nutrition and Dietetics
Volume: 124
Published: 15 June 2022
10.1159/000516739
EISBN: 978-3-318-06296-0
.../chocolate drinks. For many children it is easier to drink extra calories than to take them with more solid foods. Energy-dense snacks, such as ice-cream without or with extra whipped cream, chocolate, chocolate mousse or energy-dense puddings (with cream), potato chips (fried in oil), nuts, nuts...
Book Chapter
Series: Nestlé Nutrition Institute Workshop Series
Volume: 91
Published: 13 March 2019
EISBN: 978-3-318-06403-2
...References References 1. Food Research and Action Center (2017): School Breakfast Scorecard 2016-2017. http://frac.org/wp-content/uploads/school-breakfast-scorecard-sy-2015-2016.pdf (accessed March 7, 2018). 2. Hanks AS, Just DR, Wansink B: Chocolate milk consequences: a pilot study...
Book Chapter
Series: World Review of Nutrition and Dietetics
Volume: 113
Published: 17 April 2015
10.1159/000375193
EISBN: 978-3-318-02691-7
... • Energy-dense foods, e.g. deep-fried foods (French fries), fatty foods • Energy-dense drinks, e.g. milk shakes, high-fat milk/chocolate drinks. For many children it is easier to drink extra calories than to take them with more solid foods • Energy-dense snacks, e.g. ice cream without or with extra...
Book Chapter
Series: Monographs in Oral Science
Volume: 28
Published: 07 January 2020
10.1159/000455374
EISBN: 978-3-318-06517-6
... acceptable, and in some countries, flavouring (almost always chocolate) including sucrose, is added to school milk. This chapter will, therefore, briefly consider yoghurt and dental caries, and the probable effects of adding flavouring to bovine milk. Milk is also considered a suitable vehicle for substances...
Book Chapter
Series: Monographs in Oral Science
Volume: 30
Published: 08 March 2022
10.1159/000520766
EISBN: 978-3-318-06913-6
... diet with additional sticky sugar in the form of sweets consumed between meals (chocolate, caramel, 8-toffee, and 24-toffee groups). This group aimed to elucidate the impact of sugars in high concentrations consumed in between meals in both sugar retention and dental caries experience. The first...
Book Chapter
Series: Nestlé Nutrition Institute Workshop Series
Volume: 91
Published: 13 March 2019
10.1159/000493705
EISBN: 978-3-318-06403-2
... is compromised. One classic example was in Oregon where it was decided to abandon the sale of chocolate-flavored milk in favor of plain milk in 11 elementary schools [ 2 ]. The net effect was a 12% fall in sales and a 24% rise in milk wastage. Thus, palatability is a third key element in shaping school breakfast...
Book Chapter
Series: Contributions to Nephrology
Volume: 184
Published: 11 February 2015
EISBN: 978-3-318-02706-8
... 2006;70:144-150. 6. Pruijm M, Hofmann L, Charollais-Thoenig J, Forni V, Maillard M, Coristine A, Stuber M, Burnier M, Vogt B: Effect of dark chocolate on renal tissue oxygenation as measured by BOLD-MRI in healthy volunteers. Clin Nephrol 2013;80:211-217. 7. Simon-Zoula SC, Hofmann L, Giger...
Book
Book Cover Image
Series: Medicine and Sport Science
Volume: 59
Published: 17 October 2012
10.1159/isbn.978-3-8055-9993-1
EISBN: 978-3-8055-9993-1
Book Chapter
Series: Nestlé Nutrition Institute Workshop Series
Volume: 75
Published: 15 August 2013
EISBN: 978-3-318-02333-6
... of respiratory tract illness. Med Sci Sports Exerc 2012;44:18-26. 21. Allgrove JE, Farrell E, Gleeson M, et al: Regular dark chocolate consumption's reduction of oxidative stress and increase of free-fatty-acid mobilization in response to prolonged cycling. Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab 2011;21:113-123. 22...
Book Chapter
Series: Contributions to Human Development
Volume: 26
Published: 29 October 2013
10.1159/000354364
EISBN: 978-3-318-02489-0
... was based on a story with a similar structure to Little Red Riding Hood involving a wolf that tricked a little goat. The other was closely modeled on a standard false belief task - Maxi, the main character, put his chocolate in a container and left the scene. In Maxi's absence, his brother ate most...
Book Chapter
Series: Monographs in Oral Science
Volume: 28
Published: 07 January 2020
10.1159/000455373
EISBN: 978-3-318-06517-6
... in solution during their meal per day, a bread group consumed additionally 345 g of sugar with sugared sticky bread, a chocolate group consumed 110 g of extra sugar. Next to groups that received their extra sugar during their meals there were groups that received the extra sugar between their meals: 4 × 15 g...
Book Chapter
Series: Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine
Volume: 21
Published: 11 December 2017
10.1159/000481326
EISBN: 978-3-318-06123-9
... the participant and the proxy; this is described below in Proxy-reports and information bias . The same applies to eating chocolate. Assessment of disease symptoms is also often influenced by the proxy perspective. While itching in the index subject can be observed by the proxy (although not all the time...
Book Chapter
Series: Nestlé Nutrition Institute Workshop Series
Volume: 95
Published: 12 January 2021
10.1159/000511509
EISBN: 978-3-318-06866-5
... in added sugars and of nutrient-poor content, such as candies, ice cream, and chocolates [ 6 ]. Habits involving complementary feeding are also among the families’ responsibilities. There is an early and high intake of inadequate food choices, especially added sugar, sweets, biscuits, and candies...
Book Chapter
Series: Contributions to Nephrology
Volume: 184
Published: 11 February 2015
10.1159/000365822
EISBN: 978-3-318-02706-8
... nephrotoxicity of CM such as the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine might have an effect through this mechanism. Interestingly, dark Swiss chocolate might increase renal medullary oxygenation in human [ 6 ]. The role in preventing CM nephropathy has not been studied. Fig. 2 Different mechanisms of renal...
Book Chapter
Series: Advances in Oto-Rhino-Laryngology
Volume: 72
Published: 10 August 2011
10.1159/000324635
EISBN: 978-3-8055-9723-4
... ]. Nasal Challenge with Live NTHi On day 21, live NTHi suspension (10 8 CFU) was injected into the nose. Twenty-four hours after the nasal challenge, mice were sacrificed and nasal wash samples were collected. The diluted samples were spread on chocolate agar plates for quantification of live bacteria...
Book Chapter
Series: Nestlé Nutrition Institute Workshop Series
Volume: 67
Published: 15 February 2011
EISBN: 978-3-8055-9587-2
... in overweight men and women. Am J Clin Nutr 2009;90:70-75 22. Harper A, James A, Flint A, Astrup A: Increased satiety after intake of a chocolate milk drink compared with a carbonated beverage, but no difference in subsequent ad libitum lunch intake. Br J Nutr 2007;97:579-583 23. Potier M, Fromentin G...
Book Chapter
Series: Nestlé Nutrition Institute Workshop Series
Volume: 67
Published: 15 February 2011
10.1159/000325581
EISBN: 978-3-8055-9587-2
... milk [ 21 ], chocolate milk [ 22 ], high protein cheese [ 23 ], and low-fat yogurt [ 24 ]. While increased satiety translated into reduced ad libitum energy intake in some of these studies [ 21 ]; it failed to do so in others [ 22 , 24 ], but did not result in higher energy intake compared to control...
Book Chapter
Series: Current Problems in Dermatology
Volume: 50
Published: 01 September 2016
10.1159/000446051
EISBN: 978-3-318-05889-5
... [ 15 ]. Foods have been implicated in idiopathic pruritus ani such as caffeinated drinks, alcohol, milk products, peanuts, spices, citrus fruits, grapes, tomatoes (histamine), and chocolate; some researchers have shown a decrease in itch within 14 days if these are avoided [ 15 ]. Management...