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arthropod

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Book Chapter
Series: Issues in Infectious Diseases
Volume: 5
Published: 25 June 2007
10.1159/000104246
EISBN: 978-3-318-01399-3
... Abstract Wolbachia pipientis is an intracellular bacteria found within the cytoplasm of a highproportion of arthropods. Widespread in insects, Wolbachia is also commonly found in otherarthropod groups, including mites, spiders and terrestrial isopods. Wolbachia are normallymaternally inherited...
Book Chapter
Series: Issues in Infectious Diseases
Volume: 5
Published: 25 June 2007
10.1159/000104228
EISBN: 978-3-318-01399-3
... Abstract Collaborative studies between Marshall Hertig, an entomologist, and Samuel Wolbach,a pathologist, on the presence and identification of microorganisms in arthropods, resulted inthe discovery of Wolbachia in Culex pipientis in 1924, although the complete description ofWolbachia...
Book Chapter
Series: Developments in Biologicals
Volume: 135
Published: 18 April 2013
10.1159/000276828
EISBN: 978-3-318-02366-4
... Abstract Disease outbreaks caused by arthropod-borne animal viruses (arboviruses) resulting in significant livestock and economic losses world-wide appear to be increasing. Rift Valley fever (RVF) virus is an important arbovirus that causes lethal disease in cattle, camels, sheep and goats...
Book Chapter
Series: Genome Dynamics
Volume: 6
Published: 27 August 2009
10.1159/000235769
EISBN: 978-3-8055-9193-5
... Abstract The α-proteobacterial genus Bartonella comprises numerous arthropod-borne pathogens that share a common host-restricted life-style, which is characterized by long-lasting intraerythrocytic infections in their specific mammalian reservoirs and transmission by blood-sucking arthropods...
Book Chapter
Series: Frontiers in Diabetes
Volume: 29
Published: 31 August 2020
10.1159/000506554
EISBN: 978-3-318-06734-7
... Abstract The onset of disproportionate urination has been known since the mists of time, as was the notion that urine emitted in large quantity was often sweet and had the property of attracting bees, flies and other arthropods, or even vertebrates. Mention of diabetes is made in ancient...
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Book Cover Image
Series: Issues in Infectious Diseases
Volume: 5
Published: 25 June 2007
10.1159/isbn.978-3-318-01399-3
EISBN: 978-3-318-01399-3
Book Chapter
Series: Chemical Immunology and Allergy
Volume: 96
Published: 16 March 2012
10.1159/000331802
EISBN: 978-3-8055-9895-8
... Abstract The ‘foreignness’ of proteins that we encounter in our homes and outdoors is in large part dependent on their evolutionary distance from man. This is relevant to understanding the differences between mammalian allergens, e.g. cats, and arthropod allergens, e.g. mites and cockroaches...
Book Chapter
Series: Current Problems in Dermatology
Volume: 41
Published: 09 May 2011
10.1159/000323304
EISBN: 978-3-8055-9687-9
.... Most pathogens cannot penetrate healthy skin, and the vast majority of skin infections, thus, results from breaches of cutaneous integrity (skin wounds, arthropod bites, barrier function defects). Cutaneous infections, in turn, are controlled primarily by a functioning skin innate immune system...
Book Chapter
Series: Frontiers of Oral Biology
Volume: 14
Published: 20 April 2010
10.1159/000313705
EISBN: 978-3-8055-9407-3
... and cocoons, as shown by some arthropods, the ability to create nests out of saliva, as shown by the Aerodramus swiftlets, or the ability to produce venom from modified salivary glands. In this chapter these different adaptations will be discussed, looking at how the salivary glands have become adapted...
Book Chapter
Series: Current Problems in Dermatology
Volume: 37
Published: 27 April 2009
10.1159/000213072
EISBN: 978-3-8055-9115-7
... Abstract Ticks are obligate blood-sucking arthropods that transmit pathogens while feeding, and in Europe, more vector-borne diseases are transmitted to humans by ticks than by any other agent. In addition to neurotoxins, ticks can transmit bacteria (e.g. rickettsiae, spirochetes) viruses...
Book Chapter
Series: Issues in Infectious Diseases
Volume: 5
Published: 25 June 2007
10.1159/000104233
EISBN: 978-3-318-01399-3
... Abstract Wolbachia of arthropods and nematodes have contrasting patterns of association withtheir hosts. These patterns reflect the biological nature of the associations: parasitic in arthropodsand possibly mutualistic in filarial nematodes. Genome sequence data are aiding in boththe resolution...
Book
Book Cover Image
Series: Monographs in Virology
Volume: 6
Published: 28 November 1972
10.1159/isbn.978-3-318-04028-9
EISBN: 978-3-318-04028-9
Book Chapter
Series: Contributions to Nephrology
Volume: 183
Published: 16 May 2014
EISBN: 978-3-318-02651-1
... à l'étude de l'excrétion chez les Arthropodes. Arch Biol 1903;20:217-222. 22. Miller A: Biology of Drosophila , edited by M. Demerec. Woodbury/NY, Cold Spring Harbor Press, 1950, pp 450-452. 23. Mills RP, King RC: The pericardial cells of Drosophila melanogaster . Q J Microsc Sci 1965;106(suppl 3...
Book
Book Cover Image
Published: 07 July 1969
10.1159/isbn.978-3-318-05014-1
EISBN: 978-3-318-05014-1
Book Chapter
Series: Chemical Immunology and Allergy
Volume: 101
Published: 21 May 2015
10.1159/000375508
EISBN: 978-3-318-02341-1
..., the potential allergenic cross-reactivity within the fish family and between shellfish and other arthropods (arachnids and insects), the specific diagnostic approach of crude vs. commercial extracts, and the natural course and clinical predictive index for transient vs. persistent allergies. Prevalence...
Book
Book Cover Image
Volume: 2
Published: 02 November 1966
10.1159/isbn.978-3-318-05159-9
EISBN: 978-3-318-05159-9
Book Chapter
Series: Contributions to Nephrology
Volume: 183
Published: 16 May 2014
10.1159/000360117
EISBN: 978-3-318-02651-1
... in Drosophila - a common feature of arthropods - this two-part structure is sufficient to remove metabolic waste, store toxins, and maintain homeostasis. Fig. 1 Adult Drosophila renal system. Pericardial nephrocytes line the heart and are physically separate from the malphigian tubules (see text...
Book Chapter
Series: Chemical Immunology and Allergy
Volume: 101
Published: 21 May 2015
EISBN: 978-3-318-02341-1
...: Molecular basis of arthropod cross-reactivity: IgE-binding cross-reactive epitopes of shrimp, house dust mite and cockroach tropomyosins. Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2002;129:38-48. 22. Szépfalusi Z, Ebner C, Pandjaitan R, Orlicek F, Scheiner O, Boltz-Nitulescu G, Kraft D, Ebner H: Egg yolk alpha-livetin...
Book Chapter
Series: Endocrine Development
Volume: 26
Published: 15 September 2014
10.1159/000363151
EISBN: 978-3-318-02721-1
.... As mentioned above insects and other arthropods like Drosophila do not synthesize thyroid hormone and they do not contain a TR but still they undergo metamorphosis from pulpal to adult stage. However, in these animals the regulation of their metamorphosis is taken over by another hormone/NR couple...
Book Chapter
Series: Chemical Immunology and Allergy
Volume: 101
Published: 21 May 2015
EISBN: 978-3-318-02341-1
...-Kee S, Plante M, Lehrer SB: Molecular basis of arthropod cross-reactivity: IgE-binding cross-reactive epitopes of shrimp, house dust mite and cockroach tropomyosins. Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2002;129:38-48. 35. Woo CK, Bahna SL: Not all shellfish ‘allergy' is allergy! Clin Transl Allergy 2011;1:3...