Article PDF first page preview

Article PDF first page preview

Introduction: Venlafaxine (VEN) is a selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) that mainly helps treat major depressive disorder and anxiety and panic disorders. It works by inhibiting the reuptake of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) and noradrenaline (NA) by presynaptic neurons. Additionally, VEN administration has been linked with a bleeding predisposition, that may be due to the inhibition of NA and 5-HT uptake by platelets which have their own receptors on their surface and are implicated in platelet aggregation. Case presentation: Herein, we report a case of a 54-year-old patient treated with VEN, who presented with a hematoma in the anterior abdominal muscle. We also present the observational studies and case reports highlighting the association of SNRIs use with various hemorrhagic complications ranging from gastrointestinal hemorrhage or vaginal bleeding to bleeding during or after surgery due to either thrombocytopenia or impaired platelet aggregation. Conclusion: Given the cases of either reductions in the platelet count or impairment of platelet activity accompanied by bleeding events, every clinician should be aware of these possible adverse effects when prescribing SNRIs.

This content is only available via PDF.
You do not currently have access to this content.